Best Sunspot Decks, Builds, And Card Analysis

Den_CCG is back with more tips and tricks to keep in mind with one of the best 1-cost cards Marvel Snap has to offer: Sunspot!

As more combo synergies start to emerge, more emphasis is put on the final turns. Due to this, 1-Cost cards have lost significant power compared to the early days of the game. One card stands as an exception.

Sunspot has been a steady force. Although his first claim to glory came from his synergy with The Infinaut, the card has managed to be included in other synergies, sometimes alongside its best friend, sometimes simply as the best 1-Cost card available.

As a 1-Cost card, Sunspot is a bit of a weird one. One wouldn’t expect a cheap card like this to be able to contest for a location on its own. 1-Cost cards are often flexible tools we can fit in our curve at different stages of a game that generate a small profit for a small cost.

Sunspot is very different from this concept, as the card is arguably the worst 1-Cost card if you keep that mindset of “small cost for small profit”. Instead, the card wants you to think big, to think greedy, and, most of the time, to think combo.


Gameplay and Synergies

With the ability to transform each unspent energy into its own power, Sunspot rewards you for not playing on curve. While it is quite a bad deal on paper, as one energy is worth more than one power in Marvel Snap, there are other benefits that come with passive gameplay.

First, there is another limited resource in Marvel Snap: available spots on the board.

We get 12 spots every game, which is more than enough considering that represents playing 2 units a turn. In practice, however, we often do not want to invest all 3 locations to their maximum capacity, or to do so steadily over 6 turns.

Whether it is bad locations to play onto (Jotunheim), locked up locations (Sanctum Sanctorum) or simply needing the space for later, being able to play on curve every turn isn’t so easy in Marvel Snap. As a result, we can find ourselves being forces to end turns with unspent energy because we valued our space more than our energy.

Here are a few examples of cards you would like to play on empty locations to maximize their potential :

Another type of card which reduces how many spots we want to use are those that summon other cards, effectively taking multiple spots on their own:

There is another reason to not spend energy: Initiative.
Just like any card game, Marvel Snap is a game best played when we have as much information as possible to beat our opponent.
As such, we sometimes want to be passive in order to collect information and use our cards to the fullest, rather than be proactive and run the risk of being countered. Tech cards are the textbook example of such cards.

With that many synergies available to build around the card, Sunspot is a card that can be slotted in a lot of different archetypes, serving as a flexible support for those turns where playing cards isn’t helping our gameplan.


Budget Sunspot

Budget Sunspot
Created by den
, updated 2 months ago
3x Collection Level 1-14
3x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
6x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
4
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
5.1
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

A staple when talking about Sunspot, the control archetype is one of the few left that can be considered competitive while playing only Pool 1 and 2 cards. This version is trying to play as few Pool 2 cards as possible, but unfortunately, Jubilee, The Infinaut and Storm are necessary to the build.

This deck is a good example of the passive gameplay that Sunspot tends to shine in. If you get our featured card down on turn one, then suddenly, not playing on curve isn’t so much of a problem.

It also alleviates the pressure of playing our tech cards on curve, and makes it easy to skip turn 5 for The Infinaut.


All-In On Sunspot

Sunspot Sandman
Created by den
, updated 2 months ago
2x Collection Level 1-14
2x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
4x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
4x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
4.3
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
4.7
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

While he is rarely the star of the deck, Sunspot is at his best in ramp oriented strategy, as he acts as a balance in case we don’t get what we need to use our mana.

In this deck, we are looking to combine ramp (Psylocke, Wave) and disruption (Wave, Sandman) as a way to limit what both players can do and maximize the impact of our biggest cards.

As we are looking to mostly play during the last few turns, Sunspot can easily gain some power in the first turns. Also, once we have Sandman in play, or if we play Wave, it is extremely likely that we will be left with unspent energy that Sunspot can gobble up.


Competitive Sunspot

Sunspot competitive
Created by den
, updated 2 months ago
1x Collection Level 1-14
2x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
5x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
4x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
3.9
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
5.1
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

Kind of an upgraded version of the control archetype, this deck digs into Pool 3 in order to reach new highs. In this deck, we have a lot of two-card combos, meaning we can often find one half but not the other, and are left waiting because of it. Sunspot is a nice way to benefit from this forced waiting room until we assemble our combos.

Thanks to Sunspot, we can afford to wait and gather more information as to where we want to invest the largest chunk of our points.

Once again, Sunspot isn’t the star of the deck, as you will often win with Jubilee, Ghost Rider and the 6-Cost cards. However, our featured card makes the low rolls much better, and allows us time to assemble our plan without wasting energy.


Closing Words

Most of the time, important cards tend to be win conditions. Sunspot rarely looks like the card that will win the game, but he can often be the reason you didn’t lose it.

Being able to pass your turns while still amassing some power on the board will keep you closer to an opponent that is playing proactively. Due to this, Sunspot makes your comeback much easier, while keeping your core gameplan intact.

There aren’t many 1-Cost cards worthy of a feature article, as most of them just fit into specific archetypes. Sunspot is a bit more unique, as he enables a different style of gameplay in multiple archetypes. Sometimes, he can pay off big dividends.

I hope this piece helped some of you get a better grasp on how to use Sunspot in Marvel Snap. Feel free to drop any piece of feedback, or a specific card you’d wish to see highlighted in the future on our community Discord. As for myself, you can reach out directly on my Twitter page.

Good Game Everyone,

den
den

Den has been in love with strategy games for as long as he can remember, starting with the Heroes of Might and Magic series as a kid. Card games came around the middle school - Yu-Gi-Oh! and then Magic: The Gathering.

Hearthstone and Legends of Runeterra has been his real breakthrough and he has been a coach, writer, and caster on the French scene for many years now. He now coaches aspiring pro players and writes various articles on these games.

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