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Pool (Series) 3 Advanced Decks

Our most up to date best competitive Marvel Snap decks and archetypes you can build with only cards up to Pool 3, without Series 4 or 5 cards.

Marvel Snap Pool 3 cards are the most impactful in the game, and the ones that can be make or break for a lot of players. When one enters Pool 3, they officially step in a different world of Marvel Snap, with many more ways of building a deck, various synergies and play patterns, and some of the most impactful cards in the whole metagame.

Currently, even with Series 4 and Series 5 cards making a huge impact, several Pool 3 decks are still able to compete and provide a solid chance at climbing the ladder. The trick in order to be able to exploit Pool 3 cards to their fullest is to look for the full range of possibilities around the card, a big difference compared to Pool 1 or 2.

Indeed, up until this point, cards were relatively straightforward as to what they could do, and how to build or play around them. In this next step, you will have a chance at creating much more flexible builds with various play patterns, and different options on how to conduct the game, based on your opponent and the various locations. Deckbuilding wise, the big emphasis in Pool 3 is to make sure you know where you are going with your deck. If you manage to build a strong core, then you can use the flexible cards to complement your idea, and have a deck able to both push for its own agenda, or annoy the opponent.

Pool 3 features many cards worthy of being the core of your deck, Sera, Mister Negative, Wong, Patriot and others. You will also meet some cards that can seemingly help any kind of strategy and make sense in the overall goal of their deck, such as Aero, Leader or Magneto for example. So welcome to Pool 3, the biggest land of your Marvel Snap journey so far. There are a lot of things to discover, and this guide is here to help you get started on the best decks you might face while in Pool 3.

Decks in this guide are the best ones you can build with only Pool 3 cards, without Series 4 and 5. For more beginner friendly decks featuring only one Pool 3 card (yes, for every one), check out our Pool 3 Beginner Decks series below!


The Good Cards Archetype

Good Cards
Created by den
, updated 19 days ago
4x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
3x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
5x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
3.7
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
5.1
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

As time passes and you collect more cards, you start having enough cards that are simply good on their own, and don’t necessarily need a deck to build around them. It can be cards worth a lot of power for their energy cost (Maximus, Lizard), cards with huge ceiling for their cost (Sunspot, Thor), cards with a very powerful ability (Aero, Leader), or cards which are making a lot of sense in the current metagame (Leech, Magneto, Shang-Chi). The mix of all these cards is called the “Good Cards” archetype, a pile of cards simply about playing the current best ones in the game.

As I’m writing this, the archetype is very well positioned in the metagame, arguably a solid top 5 pick. Its ability to get ahead early in the game, and leverage this lead with powerful abilities later in the game, makes it both a simple and effective concept.

Get priority (more power than your opponent) early on with Lizard and Maximus, keep it while gathering information with White Queen, and then just dictate the last two turns with Aero and Leader. If this plan would fail, or the draws don’t align, you still have a couple of other patterns thanks to alternate plays on every mana cost. It doesn’t get much more complicated than this, the rest is all about adapting to your opponent and the locations.

Leech is the most important card in the deck, as it can make or break some matchups. Look to play it as early as possible against highly synergistic builds in order to derail their usually extremely important turn six.


Good Cards Devil Dinosaur

Handsize Priority
Created by den
, updated 13 days ago
1x Collection Level 1-14
5x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
2x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
3x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
1x Starter Card
3.2
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
3.8
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

A variant of the Good Cards deck, with Devil Dinosaur included to offer another way to develop a ton of points, and have more resources available thorough the game. This build tends to be easier to grasp as it contains less reactive, or matchup based cards. On the other end, this deck develops fewer points during the first four turns, which can make it harder to seize priority going into the Aero turn, for example. Also, it is important to have a good sense of hand management in order to maximize the power of Devil Dinosaur, but also make sure Moon Girl or White Queen don’t have their ability impaired.

The deck clearly has two different parts to it:

  • Utility cards: Most of the deck can be considered a utility card – contributing for points, but also adding something else to the equation. We are looking to play those cards without locking options for ourselves later in the game. Cosmo is probably the most sensitive of the bunch, as we have to think of not playing it where we will play Aero or Leader. It can serve as a nice protection to our Devil Dinosaur, though, so positioning it properly is critical
  • Win Conditions: Devil Dinosaur, Aero, and Leader are the three big cards in the deck, with each expected to contest or win a lane. Most of the game should be conceptualized with those cards in mind, likely coming down in the last two turns.

The whole point when playing this deck is to set up the best possible situation for our win conditions to be successful at winning us a lane. If the utility cards are able to take a lane the opponent didn’t seriously invest into, it makes it even easier later on. Just like the other Good Cards archetype, seizing priority when going into our Aero turn tends to be an influential part of the card being at its best.


Patriot

Patriot
Created by den
, updated 13 days ago
1x Collection Level 1-14
2x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
5x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
1x Recruit Season
3x Starter Card
3.1
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
3.1
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

One of the first archetypes centered around a card you might see in your Pool 3 adventure is Patriot, a card that brings back most of the No Ability “vanilla” cards you dismissed back in Pool 1. In this deck, Misty Knight, Shocker, and Cyclops are making a comeback, and actually represent the core of this deck, alongside its signature card: Patriot.

The concept is simple, we want to pair a certain type of cards with the buff that will make them stronger, and then use Mystique and Onslaught in order to duplicate that buff and get even stronger. This deck has three different buffs, which can totally work together and buff the same cards:

  • Patriot looks to strengthen our vanilla cards in the deck, helping them go from a card nobody would think about playing to a threat for the opponent on the lane they are played. Wasp, Misty Knight, Shocker, Cyclops are the card which can receive Patriot‘s +2 buff. Also, the Squirrel from Squirrel Girl and the Rock from Debrii are considered No Ability cards.
  • Ka-Zar buffs our 1-Cost cards, getting some small numbers to become a more reasonable contribution. Squirrel Girl, Misty Knight and mostly Ultron‘s Drones are affected by Ka-Zar.
  • Blue Marvel is the nice guy, he will buff every of your cards in play, no distinction, everyone gets a +1.

Ideally, the perfect setup would be to decide as early as possible which locations we intend on fighting for, and which will serve as the recipient for our buffing cards. Indeed, with Patriot being a 1 power card, Mystique a 0 power card or Blue Marvel a 3 power card, the location they are being played on can often be difficult to leverage to our advantage. Even with Onslaught or Ultron contributing more to the points total, it is rare we have a fighting chance against an opponent who decided to heavily invest into that location. With that in mind, it is important to make sure we are really strong on the other two lanes.


DeathWave

DeathWave
Created by den
, updated 13 days ago
5x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
2x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
5x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
3.5
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
4.2
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

The best deck in the game for quite some time, a lot of the popular tech cards in the current metagame are due to DeathWave’s dominant run before and during the global release period. For example, did you know Aero became the feared card it is today because it was discovered to be a great card in the DeathWave deck. It allows you to control the opponent’s turn while we can freely play Death for free somewhere important. Similarly, Leader rose to being one of the most hated cards in the game, but once was simply considered a counter to DeathWave last turn. Something that was so difficult to match, we had no choice but try to take it for ourselves. Lastly, the big popularity of Armor, one of the recurring cards in the 2-Cost slot in Marvel Snap is largely due to the destroy mechanic being amongst the strongest one when left unchecked.

So where does DeathWave get most of its power, it’s a pretty simple pattern:

  • Step 1: Get at least two cards destroyed during the first four turns of the game.
  • Step 2: Play Wave on turn five.
  • Step 3: You can now play any card in your plus Death, which should cost two or less energy at this time.

Ideally, the other card will be Leader or Aero as a way to control your opponent’s turn in the process, and make sure you stay ahead on the lanes you built with your destroy synergy during the first part of the game.


Lockjaw On Reveal

lockjaw on reveal
Created by den
, updated 13 days ago
1x Collection Level 1-14
1x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
3x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
7x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
4.1
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
6.7
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

Regularly labelled the “high roll” archetype, as the core strategies relies on summoning random cards from our deck. Lockjaw is amongst the card every deckbuilder loves to have at its disposal in order to try a ton of different combinations around. Once you understand the different parts of the deck, you can actually have a lot of fun trying all the various options to find the ones that suits you best.

Here is a typical deck breakdown:

Once you understand the role of each card in the deck, you can actually find a ton of small packages to test for yourself. Most of the time, On Reveal cards tend to do great in the deck, as they can get triggered multiple times through being cycled with Lockjaw. Korg or Iceman have seen play in the archetype in the past.

Gameplay wise, the key is not to get carried away by your Lockjaw lane and actually remember Marvel Snap requires you to win two lanes. As such, you have to think about the cards you want to use alongside Lockjaw, and those who can serve to anchor the second location you covet.


Discard Lockjaw

Discard Lockjaw
Created by den
, updated 15 days ago
4x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
3x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
5x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
3.6
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
4
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

The discard synergy is one that is associated with fast, flooding based decks until you reach Pool 3. Then, you will unlock some key cards to get the discard archetype towards something combo-oriented, especially as you get Dracula and Lockjaw into the mix.

Similarly to the Lockjaw On Reveal archetype, the deck tries to abuse Lockjaw in order to cycle its cards, and repeat their abilities doing so. Except, contrary to the other, we aren’t trying to cheat out specific cards, we are just looking to discard as much as possible in order to grow Morbius, Apocalypse and duplicate Swarm. So while the previous deck was likely dominating the lane you played Lockjaw on, the Discard archetype focuses its points on the other lanes instead. Indeed, the Lockjaw lane will usually be filled with utility cards, allowing our other cards to grow, but not developing a ton of points themselves.

Let’s take a look at the basic synergies in the deck:

  • Morbius and Dracula are what is called a “carry”, meaning they should carry the load on the lane they are played onto, and we expect them to anchor said location.
  • Lockjaw is a “motor”, it helps our deck do what it is best at more efficiently, and helps to dig in the deck to find more discards.
  • Swarm and Apocalypse are the recipients of our Discard effects. Apocalypse grows with the intent to be discarded by Dracula at game’s end, while Swarm can be a great utility to play behind Lockjaw and dig into our deck.
  • Colleen Wing and Lady Sif are targeted discards, so we shouldn’t have any bad surprises. The other cards might require some hand management in order to not throw away a valuable resource. With that in mind, you don’t necessarily have to go all-in on Lockjaw early on. It is reasonable to wait until turn five, once you prepared your hand to discard Apocalypse a ton of times.
  • Leech is the last card in the build, included for high roll purposes, as it is a nice early pull on Lockjaw.

Electro Ramp

Electro Ramp
Created by den
, updated 13 days ago
2x Collection Level 1-14
1x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
2x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
7x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
4.1
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
4.7
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

Probably the easiest deck to pilot on this list, Electro Ramp is a deck with an agenda, and doesn’t like when it is disturbed. As such, once you understand the deck’s agenda, and the various way you can push it, there isn’t much more you need in order to be a good Electro Ramp pilot:

  • If the start can be rocky at times, the deck really wants to focus on producing a super strong turn four, five and six pattern. Without Electro, we can start that pattern with Psylocke or Wave as well.
  • We have the opponent disruption cards (Leech, Leader, Magneto) and development based cards (White Tiger, Doctor Doom), both kind of cards merge in their synergy with Wong and Odin.
  • In order to make sure our On Reveal effects aren’t being denied by the opponent, we want priority going into our key turns. Ebony Maw and Lizard being worth a lot of points should help in that regard.

And there you go, you are all set in order to play Electro Ramp if you know these three basics of the deck. The rest of the experience if mostly navigating the locations, and trying to understand how can you opponent limit your agenda based on your hand, and the annoying cards they could be packing.


Closing Words

I truly believe all the decks on this list to be strong, like Infinite material kind of strong. However, the key point when you will start playing in Pool 3 are your snap and retreats. Up until Pool 2, you could always get away with it, facing enough bots to get some grinding done, or capitalizing on your opponent’s inexperience of the game. Once you enter Pool 3, you will have to be a little more careful, as strategies will diversify, and players will have picked up more experience under their belt.

Another emphasis of Pool 3 is the frustration often associated with collecting all the cards, as it will start being much slower than compared to Pool 1 and 2. You might feel robbed of losing to a card you do not have yet, or helpless against certain strategies you are facing for the very first time. This is all part of the experience, and it is important to detach ourselves from simply trying to grind cubes, and instead trying to learn this new environment. Comfort will come back sooner than you expect it, and you will be back on the grind in no time, as long as you allow yourself this precious time to get settled in Pool 3, the toughest one in Marvel Snap.

Have some questions about a deck, missing some cards and need advice? Feel free to reach out to the Marvel Snap Zone team on Discord, or find me directly on Twitter.

Good Game Everyone.

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den
den

Den has been in love with strategy games for as long as he can remember, starting with the Heroes of Might and Magic series as a kid. Card games came around the middle school - Yu-Gi-Oh! and then Magic: The Gathering.

Hearthstone and Legends of Runeterra has been his real breakthrough and he has been a coach, writer, and caster on the French scene for many years now. He now coaches aspiring pro players and writes various articles on these games.

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