Best Moon Girl Decks, Builds, And Card Analysis

Looking for more ways to use those Pool One Powerhouses? Join den_CCG as he highlights one of the most unique effects there - Moon Girl!

For the majority of Season One back in June, several competitive decks were built with Pool One cards as the core of their strategy.
At the time, the very young Marvel Snap didn’t have many people in Pool Three yet, so players were playing with what they managed to unlock. This forced them to be creative with a limited amount of cards. With these restrictions, players managed to be creative enough to create a NovaDevil DinosaurMoon Girl deck which demolished the ladder back then, and was heavily nerfed on June 29th.

In that patch, Moon Girl went from a 3-Cost card to a 4-Cost card and lost the majority of her value for decks who benefited from her duplicating ability.
Since then, we have seen the card in some competitive builds like DeathWave and Discard Combo(RIP) as a support, but she usually didn’t last long, and more flexible options ended up replacing Moon Girl.

As a result, Moon Girl isn’t the hot commodity she once was, and is nowhere to be seen in the competitive world nowadays. She is considered too expensive at four mana compared to cards unlocked further down the collection track.
In my opinion, she still remains a great, unique card in Marvel Snap, and one budget players shouldn’t overlook on their journey to building great decks with limited options. Eventually, maybe the card can even still contribute to competitive builds if the deck was adapted a bit more to fit her strengths.


Moon Girl: Gameplay and Synergies

As a card, Moon Girl will rarely be the one scoring the points if you look at the final board. However, the card can be the most important building block of the whole game plan.

The big limitation to Moon Girl is her mana cost, which is the reason her nerf was so devastating. In order to get the full value from Moon Girl’s ability, you need to pay four energy to play a three power card, which gives you cards in hand.
As such, you need to be able to spend four energy either on turn four or five (six if you play Magik on five), plus be able to make use of the cards you duplicated one way or another.

In the current competitive environment, the initial investment required by Moon Girl is too much. However, considering the amount of synergies Moon Girl can work with, it’s difficult to imagine not finding one worth the four energy investment.

Moon Girl activate two kinds of synergies primarily.

  1. Cards that want to see you duplicate cards in your hand.
  2. Cards worth playing multiple times.

In the first category, we find most of Moon Girl’s old time friends, A.K.A the Nerfed Club. These are cards which directly benefit from Moon Girl’s ability to add points to the board.

In the second category, there are many more cards that can fit the bill. Moon Girl can be used as a utility tool to duplicate cheap effects that we may want to repeat:

And lastly, we also might want to duplicate some cards because they are worth a ton of points. Usually, this would involve buffing a cheap card or reducing the cost of an expensive one before copying it:


Budget Moon Girl Deck:

Moon Girl Zoo
Created by den
, updated 1 month ago
2x Collection Level 1-14
6x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
3x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
1x Recruit Season
2.4
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
2.7
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

The Zoo archetype actually feels like a great playing field for Moon Girl since Nakia’s nerf. Due to the nerf, we need to rely on more straightforward power generation. I wanted to go with something different from the Devil Dinosaur deck, which I expect most people to know about already, and the deck being more about the Dinosaur than Moon Girl.

Unless you run Iron Man* in the deck, turn four and five are usually fairly open. This frees up the space to play Moon Girl on four and reap the rewards on five. A basic play pattern for this deck would be to go :

Here are a few benefits from playing Moon Girl in this deck :

  • You can duplicate Nakia’s buff, as it only buffs two cards now.
  • You can duplicate cards that were buffed with Okoye
  • You can duplicate your 1-Cost card to buff Angela and Bishop’s much more
  • Iceman and Korg can mess up your opponent’s deck and hand
  • You have alternate play patterns for turn six if America Chavez wasn’t flexible enough.

* Iron Man could replace America Chavez. I like Chavez for consistency purposes with Angela, Bishop, Nakia and Okoye all much better if drawn early.


All In On Moon Girl:

Moon Girl and Friends
Created by den
, updated 1 month ago
6x Collection Level 18-214 (Pool 1)
3x Collection Level 222-474 (Pool 2)
2x Collection Level 486+ (Pool 3)
1x Starter Card
2.3
Cost
0-
1
2
3
4
5+
2.5
Power
0-
1
2
3
4
5+

Moon Girl can really be played alongside various synergies. If our budget deck was looking to abuse buffs, this one focuses more on replicating effects and abusing discounted cards.

  • Devil Dinosaur, The Collector and Angela are the payoff cards. We are looking to grow these as big as possible to challenge locations.
  • Beast, Quinjet and Moon Girl are the support cards. We use their abilities to copy and discount the other cards, which opens various play patterns as a result, while buffing our payoffs in the process.
  • The other cards are the effects we are looking to trigger during the game in order to buff our payoffs or disrupt the opponent.

So what is Moon Girl role in this deck?

  • Thanks to Quinjet and Beast, we can reduce the cost of cards we duplicate, mitigating the relatively high cost we pay for playing Moon Girl.
  • Moon Girl can duplicate our payoff cards, raising the ceiling of points we can reach in the final turns.
  • Moon Girl can duplicate Quinjet or Beast, in order to get even more discounts and flexibility in how we want to use our energy.

In this deck, Moon Girl benefits from the perfect context to abuse her duplicating ability. She is surrounded with cards that will either directly benefit from it, or allow the deck to reach new highs in the final turns after she is played.


Competitive Moon Girl Build:

While I genuinely believe the previous deck had a competitive shot, and would take a good pilot to Infinite easily, it is hard to imagine Moon Girl being anything more than a support card to an already competitive archetype for now, if we are talking about the best performing deck with Moon Girl in it.

A deck that has been tossed around lately is one featuring Deadpool as a support to the Wave archetype. While Moon Girl appeared in the original DeathWave archetype, she is no longer played in the deck.

With Deadpool joining the fray, Moon Girl finds one more card that seems like a great target to copy. Indeed, 1-Cost cards usually are the best targets for Moon Girl’s ability, as they compensate well for her four energy cost.

Also, in such a deck, we could also copy some destroyers (Carnage, Venom, Deathlok) or the Demon from The Hood as well. As a result, Moon Girl seems to be a nice support to the deck, although she doesn’t look like vital to the gameplan.

Unfortunately, this has been the case for most builds with the card since her nerf.


Moon Girl: Closing Words

Even after being nerfed, Moon Girl’s unique effect in Marvel Snap and availability very early in a player’s journey, means that she will always be a consideration for someone.

The card has a reputation for being paired with cards like The Collector or Devil Dinosaur, which are great complements for Moon Girl. Given that those cards have suffered nerfs as well, I feel like Moon Girl’s stock took a much bigger hit than it should have.

As a result, I think it’s important to analyze Moon Girl for what the card provides rather than what it was. To me, it is a support to many strategies – a rather expensive one, yes, but one with an irreplaceable effect.
I tried to illustrate this aspect of Moon Girl in this article, and I hope it can help some of you find the right build to use Moon Girl.
Feel free to drop any piece of feedback, or a specific card you’d wish to see highlighted in the future on our community Discord. As for myself, you can reach out directly on my Twitter page.

Good Game Everyone,

den
den

Den has been in love with strategy games for as long as he can remember, starting with the Heroes of Might and Magic series as a kid. Card games came around the middle school - Yu-Gi-Oh! and then Magic: The Gathering.

Hearthstone and Legends of Runeterra has been his real breakthrough and he has been a coach, writer, and caster on the French scene for many years now. He now coaches aspiring pro players and writes various articles on these games.

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